Inside Look: Edmund’s Oast, Charleston

When launching the design plans for Charleston brewpub Edmund’s Oast, owner Scott Shor says, “there wasn’t really any intention to shy away from the look of classic beer halls, nor directly seek the spirit of one. Edmund’s was not created to be like any other place we had ever been, but rather it was the place we wished existed.”

To achieve the warm, welcoming interior, Shor and architect Dan Sweeney of Stumphouse Architecture + Design took many influences as inspiration, including the look and feel of 18th-century oast houses (buildings where hops dry) and rural European architecture. The result is a large, central dining area that feels more like an old French farmhouse than a modern beer hall. On one end of the room, an open kitchen invites guests to feel like they’re part of the action. On the other wall, a sweeping bar and massive panel featuring the rotating beer offerings can be seen from every seat in the house, keeping the focus on the main draw: the beer.

“The intent was always to create the type of environment that we wanted to spend time in. Not from a professional perspective, but rather where we would want to relax as a guest,” Shor says.

“A rich, supple and warm-feeling space is what we like. It’s casual and approachable while still keeping a subtle elegance.”

Reclaimed local cypress wood was used for the ceiling, tables and bar, and the color scheme—a medley of black, brown, taupe and off-white—was inspired by the colors found in dried beer grains. Old World-style chandeliers, vintage carving knives repurposed as coat hooks, and used carving boards displayed as wall art add extra personality to the space. Paired with the expert rustic comfort food and impressive beer list, it’s one of our favorite places to spend an evening over pints and plates.

Read more about Edmund’s Oast and other bars with great design schemes in the March/April 2016 Design Issue.